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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
in public spaces? >> i think very carefully, just as in navigated the relationship with lyndon johnson. he went out of his way to avoid taking a public position opposed to johnson on the war or poverty issues. it was only after a great deal of deliberation, a great deal of time had passed, and when he felt like he could do nothing else other than take a public stance. that is what is going on in the black community today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage t
with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've been in jail. he won the nobel prize and he's still in jail in selma on the right to vote. and the aids simply told dr. king you've got to say you had a purpose. let's say that you're coming out of jail to meet with the president. and that infuriated lyndon johnson because he said nobody in the expense of here in the middle of a controversy. i'm trying to run the country. but on the matter and, he didn't want to say i won't meet with dr. martin luther king partly because he shared the goal of cutting the voting rights bill. so with the work of was kind of an ego where they said dr. king was officially coming up to
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
, right? lyndon johnson is getting sworn in on air force one. roosevelt had to go to a house in buffalo. there's one where mckinley died and one where roosevelt was sworn in and he kind of stumbled through it all, yeah i got the oath. so he didn't have his hand on the bible. he said a few words, but he became president. it reminds us that things are sometimes haphazard at inaugurations. we don't get to pre plain like we do for this one. >> president obama's first inauguration drew record crowds. how do you think it will be remembered? >> i have kids who have the place mat and on it you have presidents on it. it's all white faces and now you have the first african-american. man, was that historic. you had people pouring in here electricity in the air. it didn't matter what the speech was that year. it was about the atmospherics. this time around i think the speech the president gives is going to be more important. they're having less balls, less crowds, more enthusiasm. he can make up for that by having words that may some day be carved in marble. >> douglas brinkley.
is the enemy. lyndon johnson if you read about his efforts of mail order purchasing of guns, he moved that measure in a matter of months, and he was the master of this process. and he understood that time really was the enemy in terms of getting these measures through. to be the extent we can get a strong comprehensive package moving in the senate, get it out of the senate, and then basically surround the house with the executive branch senate action and public opinion that then i actually think this could get a life of its own and really have a strong chance. >> john: connecticut democratic congressman joe courtney, thank you for coming on the program. >> thanks, john. >> john: for more now on the president's proposals i'm happy to be joined by john rosenthal. stop handgun violence and common sense about kids an guns, and by pam simon a staffer for gabby giffords who was shot at the tucson shop shooting where the congressman was badly wounded and six others were killed. she's now a gun control advocate advocate. thank you both for joining us, john, i want to begin with you. >> thank
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
trying to read me the biography of lyndon johnson out loud from the first volume. we did not get that far because it is very, very long. one of his favorite books was "harry potter." >> could you talk a little bit about his initial reaction to the arrest and is the zeal of the prosecutors in massachusetts to go after him on the downloading of the jstor research articles? >> i was not with him -- we did not start dating more than a couple of weeks before this began. he tried really hard to wall it off. it was very stressful for him, but he tried to keep his friends and family as much as possible sort of isolated from this. he was very good at protecting other people. he was distressed by the fact the prosecutors had called two of his closest friends as witnesses at the grand jury, so he tried to protect everyone else by not giving us any information that would warrant being called as witnesses. the whole thing was just this big mistake and he helped the prosecutor's office would he had donethat' nothing illegal. as he put it, and the very few press releases he did around this, he did liken
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
in order to bring us into a new era. one of the things that lyndon johnson said famously is that when a president is elected, he's for six months he's a giraffe and thereafter a worm, so his great challenge is going to be how he figures out how to make the most of this time as a giraffe. >> let's go back outside to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my gra
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing is underneath and put a little x of spray paint and we would it shut. they know that pennsylvania avenue has been cleared. so it is a fascinating process to get pennsylvania ready for this motorcade.
of the united states. >> constitution of the united states. >> vice president lyndon b. johnson and the grief-stricken widow with him takes the presidential oath aboard the jet, which brings him, together with the body of the late president, back to washington. >> the flag flies at half-staff. the full roosevelt cabinet is asked to remain in office. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. ♪ >> filled with hope and patriotism. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to a very special edition of "cnn saturday morning." it is saturday, january 19th. i'm randi kaye, coming to you live from the national mall in washington, d.c., as we gear up for the 57th presidential inauguration. and all morning, our cnn political team will be bringing you the very latest on all the preparations for the big day and the biggest challenges as well, facing president obama in his second term. but first, we have some breaking news to tell you about. it involves the ongoing hostage crisis in algeria, involvi
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
about a couple of facts. it is a fact that this coming march is the 49th anniversary of lyndon johnson declaring war on poverty. it is a fact we have spent over $16 trillion in those 49 years, and it has failed. i like your hashtag -- party must end. i agree entirely. but let me give you two dissenting views. the welfare reform program work. the greatest decrease in child poverty in america came under bill clinton with a republican congress in the late 1990's. that is just a fact. jeffrey is shaking his head. no, it is a fact. the lowest level of black children in poverty in history was 1997. you could make an argument that having a welfare system shift toward opportunity would work. >> i'm going to give you all the time you need. before that, what would you say then to those who read the "new york times" stories when they did to review 15 years after bill clinton's welfare to work program, that women and children were falling faster into poverty than anybody else? [applause] i too was the program that helped push them in there? were they wrong? -- it was that program that helped push
disagreement about a couple of facts. it is a fact that this coming march is the 49th anniversary of lyndon johnson declaring war on poverty. it is a fact we have spent over $16 trillion in those 49 years, and it has failed. i like your hashtag -- poverty must end. i agree entirely. but let me give you two dissenting views. the welfare reform program work. the greatest decrease in child poverty in america came under bill clinton with a republican congress in the late 1990's. that is just a fact. jeffrey is shaking his head. no, it is a fact. the lowest level of black children in poverty in history was 1997. you could make an argument that having a welfare system shift toward opportunity would work. >> i'm going to give you all the time you need. before that, what would you say then to those who read the "new york times" stories when they did to review 15 years after bill clinton's welfare to work program, that women and children were falling faster into poverty than anybody else? [applause] it was that program that helped push them in there? were they wrong? >> yes, but let me carry you two
kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing touches are going up. there is a presidential seal attached to a heated glassed in area. that is where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. the city of washington has spent $6.5 mil
that you mentioned, but lyndon baines johnson and other presidents that in the second term things happen o outside of their reach, and he needs to be cognizant of history. >> thank you both for being here in person. >> happy inauguration. >> and yes. nice glasses. did you get them just for the inauguration. >> no, i didn't, but thank you. >> let's get going on the hearings and benghazi that are going to be happening this week, and congresswoman karen bass sits on the house foreign relations committee that will hear secretary clinton's testimony and joining me live now. always a pleasure, congresswoman. >> thank you. thanks for having me on. >> both of the senate and the house will hear from secretary clinton for the first time on benghazi, and what do you want to hear from secretary clinton? >> well, first of all, it is number one, good to see her and wish her the best. i am glad to know that she is feeling better, but i have to tell you that the state department has already put out a report that has identified 29 areas of recommendations, and we did have a hearing on benghazi just a few w
, lyndon b. johnson in 1963. james in brandon, florida on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i wanted to ask the country to pray for our president obama -- i am a republican, and i voted republican this year. that was to my commitment to the republican party. i am very disappointed with my party. i do not like the direction they are taking. to be honest with you, i do not like the fact that they are not cooperating in the house or any other place with democrats or with president obama. i would ask the president if he would open upper a new investigation on the 9/11 attacks on this country. i am unsatisfied with the commission report that was put out. host: that was james in brandon, florida. you can see on the capital, five large flags hanging down. the explanation of the five different flags they had hanging down -- this is a congressional report. framed against the black -- the backdrop -- the backdrop of red, white and blue -- we have at ross flag with starch -- stars are arranged in the circle. the next two flags are the flags the u.
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)